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Molly: Is The ‘It’ Drug Really As Safe As People Say?

He says that like all street drugs, there is no way to know what the toxicity level of Molly is because it is unregulated, and its components (or what it is cut with) is inconsistent and often unknown. Is Molly, a drug thought to be pure MDMA, really as safe as people say it is, or is it just a dangerous lesson in rebranding? Many doctors are saying despite its reputation as a “pure” or “gentle” drug, there is no safe way to do Molly.

A recent article by the New York Times reiterated that Molly is not exactly new. MDMA was patented by Merck in 1914, and later used by psychotherapists in the 1970s. MDMA hit New York City in the late 1980s and by the 90s, it was a popular club drug. With its popularity, adulterants were added to MDMA to make ecstasy pills. Caffeine, speed, ephedrine, ketamine, heroin, LSD, etc. were added (and each pill became unpredictable and dangerous). In the past couple of years, Molly has become the popular form of MDMA. It is often sold in powder or crystalline form, which deceivingly gives it the impression to enthusiasts that it is a safer, more pure, more approachable drug. Surprisingly, its following is not just some in the music industry, college kids or ravers. This pop culture drug is luring professionals in their 30s and 40s as well.

The Drug Abuse Warning Network recently reported that the number of MDMA-related emergency visits have doubled since 2004. Dr. Robert Glatter, an emergency-room physician in New York City, said he currently sees at least four patients a month exhibiting side effects of Molly: teeth grinding, dehydration, anxiety, insomnia, fever, hyperthermia, uncontrollable seizures, high blood pressure, and depression.

Molly is a combination of a stimulant and a psychedelic drug. Dr. Glatter warns that because people gain tolerance to psychostimulants, they use more and more to try and achieve the psychedelic effect, but can’t. What they end up increasing is the amount of the stimulant effect and thus the toxicity. He says that like all street drugs, there is no way to know what the toxicity level of Molly is because it is unregulated, and its components (or what it is cut with) is inconsistent and often unknown. Because of this, Dr. Glatter has seen adverse effects of the drug in just one or two pills. He cautions that there is no responsible way to consume Molly, and that contrary to popular belief, a user can overdose.

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